Research & Articles

Comparison between a real field trip and a virtual field trip in a nature preserve: Knowledge gained in biology and ecology.

Comparison between a real field trip and a virtual field trip in a nature preserve: Knowledge gained in biology and ecology.

This study compared a real and a virtual field trip to determine how effectively students acquired knowledge pertaining to biology and ecology. An existing nature trail was digitized and students were given activities to complete in the field and using the digitized nature trail. Differences in knowledge acquisition between the two methods were minimal, and each had unique advantages.

Development of computer-assisted virtual field trips to support multidisciplinary learning

Development of computer-assisted virtual field trips to support multidisciplinary learning

While developing virtual field trips (VFTs) can be expensive, complex, and time-consuming, this article sees the educational rewards as “well worth the effort and expense” (p. 579). This article describes the creation of a VFT, including background on decisions associated with technological and pedagogical choices, and reports that undergraduate students in this pilot were engaged with the subject matter and positive overall about the experience.

Toward a virtual field trip model for the social studies.

Toward a virtual field trip model for the social studies.

While virtual field trips (VFTs) can be a good alternative to traditional field trips, they are not always created or integrated in ways that maximize student learning. This article explores what a model VFT in social studies should look like, how teachers and developers can create authentic experiences for students using VFTs, and how well Colonial Williamsburg’s Electronic Field Trip © VFT Virtual Field Trips Ltd. 11 Program exemplifies a model VFT. The article proposes a model for designing and implementing VFTs, emphasizing the need for teacher development, active engagement, and technological literacy. It argues that virtual field trips must provide authentic experiences for students in order for them to gain the skills and knowledge they should be gaining from these experiences.

Focus on technology: Going on a journey to learn without leaving school.

Focus on technology: Going on a journey to learn without leaving school.

Like traditional field trips, virtual field trips provide numerous advantages and learning opportunities. While they need to be well-planned to work well, they allow students to connect and interact with people and places outside their school without leaving the classroom. The author recommends combining virtual field trips with traditional field trips to foster even greater student learning.

Making and taking virtual field trips in pre-k and the primary grades.

Making and taking virtual field trips in pre-k and the primary grades.

A virtual field trip (VFT) is a technology-based experience that allows children to take an educational journey without leaving the classroom. These multimedia presentations bring the sights, sounds, and descriptions of distant places to learners. Virtual fieldtrips vary in complexity. They can range from a single PowerPoint or video presentation to a multifaceted virtual experience integrating photos, videos, text, audio, video conferencing, and Internet resources.

Virtual Field Trips: Alternatives To Actual Field Trips

Virtual Field Trips: Alternatives To Actual Field Trips

Due to logistical issues, field trips are often not included in educational curricula despite the fact they are known to enhance learning. Virtual field trips (VFTs) present an alternative to these logistical problems. This article explores different types of virtual and real field trips that can be incorporated into the curriculum, and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of each.

Can Virtual Be As Effective As Real?

Can Virtual Be As Effective As Real?

This chapter explores games and simulations, virtual representations of actual learning activities, and virtual field trips. It sees these virtual activities as supplementing more traditional educational activities, but also sometimes needing to serve as a replacement for those activities when limitations of budget or student capabilities make those traditional activities challenging. The article suggests that students benefit the most when both traditional and virtual activities are used.